The N3 at Van Reenen's Pass is closed to traffic, and the Tugela Toll Plaza is closed due to a blockade by truckers. Picture: Facebook
The N3 at Van Reenen's Pass is closed to traffic, and the Tugela Toll Plaza is closed due to a blockade by truckers. Picture: Facebook

Road Freight Association calls for police to take action in N3 truck blockade

By Mercury Reporter Time of article published Dec 3, 2021

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DURBAN - The Road Freight Association (RFA) has called on the South African Police Service to take action to deal with the blockade by truckers on the N3 at Van Reenen’s Pass.

IOL reported earlier that the N3 at Van Reenen's Pass is closed to traffic, and the Tugela Toll Plaza is closed due to a blockade by truckers.

It has not yet been established what led to the blockade but in October the N3 was blocked by truckers who said they were calling for reform in the industry, including an end to the hiring of foreign truck drivers.

The RFA’s CEO Gavin Kelly said once again, the transport and logistics industry was being held captive by those who prefer to work outside the law.

“The vital N3 route between the Port of Durban and the interior has been blocked - again.

“Violence and looting has occurred according to some reports – whilst individuals have taken the law into their own hands to pull drivers from trucks to check their personal documents. Law abiding transporters are being subjected to this. ”

Kelly said according to reports the police is "monitoring the situation".

“The SAPS must intervene and take action – not stand on the sideline and ’monitor’.

“The Road Freight Association has called on government again and again to do what is necessary. They must deal with those who see themselves above the law – arrest, detain and investigate the inciters, those who perpetrate these acts, and those who take it upon themselves to act like police or authorities of the state.”

He added that those employers who continued to break the law, who weren’t registered with the relevant authorities as required by various legislative prescripts, or continued to employ individuals at rates below the minimums, had to be dealt with.

“We are fast losing any respect as a safe, efficient and desirable route for the movement of goods out of, and into, Africa – and even in South Africa.”

THE MERCURY

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